How To Make A Three-Egg Omelette

Breakfast in the garden of the Little Red House by the Sea

Now that we’re back into the rhythm of commute-work-commute-work-commute-work at home, I’m missing the restful vibe of our vacation week. I’m always much happier inside my own home than in any borrowed house, but long afternoon walks, lazy hours curled up with a good book, and uncounted moments listening to the wind chimes and watching the waves were respite for a weariness I didn’t quite know I carried. I’m trying to capture a bit of that quietness over this┬áholiday weekend that marks the end of summer breathing in greater New York City – even for those of us who don’t have to consult a school calendar.

As part of my master plan, Clay has just agreed to a 5am wake-up alarm tomorrow so we can brew coffee and tea in to-go mugs and head to our local beach for a sunrise walk. I’m bribing him through his dismay with the promise of omelettes for breakfast when we get home – just like my Mom made them for us at the Little Red House by the Sea.

How to Make a Three-Egg Omelette

  1. First, gather your tools.
    Pour hot tap water into a small bowl to warm it. Preheat your oven on the broiler setting. Set a small, oven-proof skillet containing a drizzle of olive oil on the range over medium heat. Set up a cutting board and chef’s knife.
  2. Second, prepare your filling.
    My go-to combination is a bit of whatever meats are leftover in the fridge with three spears of asparagus (cut into 1/2 inch pieces), a mushroom or two (thinly sliced), a half dozen cherry tomatoes (quartered), and a tablespoon of sharp cheese (shredded) – but choose whatever you like. You’ll want approximately 1/3 cup of filling per omelette.
    • Toss any raw vegetables into your skillet and saute them until they’ve lost their crispness. Add any pre-cooked ingredients like meat of other vegetables to the pan and stir to warm them through. Pour the water out of your now-warm bowl, dry it out, and move your vegetables into it. Wipe out your pan and place it back on the range over medium-high heat, with a teaspoon of butter tossed into it to melt.
  3. Third, taste your filling – especially if it’s made up of leftover ingredients, or any brined vegetables. Season to taste, with the plan that all flavor and seasoning will come from the filling. (I usually add black pepper liberally, but find that using pre-cooked meat means there’s no need for added salt.)
  4. Fourth, cook your eggs.
    In a small bowl (I use a glass measuring cup), beat together three eggs. We get ours directly from the farm as part of our CSA share, and they’re a combination of giant chicken and small pullet eggs; let’s assume an average size of “large”.
    • When the butter in your skillet is melted, bubbling, and fragrant, lower the heat to medium and pour your beaten eggs into the pan. Turn the pan to evenly distribute the eggs through it; as they set on the bottom, use a rubber spatula to lift the set portion and allow raw egg to run underneath.
    • When the eggs are nearly set to you your liking, remove the pan from the heat.
  5. Fifth, Assemble the omelette.
    Working quickly, scatter your filling over one-half of your cooked egg, adding any cheese as the top-most layer. Place the skillet into your oven under the broiler; leave the oven door slightly ajar to monitor the cooking/melting/browning for forty-five seconds. When the eggs are fully set and slightly browned and any cheese in the filling has melted, remove the skillet from the oven, and immediately fold it in half so that the “filled” half is covered by the “unfilled” half. Press lightly down on the top of the omelette so that the melted cheese can glue the two halves together.
  6. Sixth, serve.
    Slide your omelette onto a warmed plate, alongside a piece of hearty toast spread with tomato jam and some sliced fruit (peaches are divine just now). Hand the plate to your bleary-eyed spouse, along with a fork, a kiss, and a second-cup of coffee.

What’s your favorite “vacation” breakfast?

One response to “How To Make A Three-Egg Omelette

  1. Pingback: Simpaug Farms CSA: Weeks Ten and Eleven | Dinner at the Country House

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s